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4May/130

Article – SharePoint 2013 New Features – Shredded Storage

Among the many of the new features and enhancements in SharePoint 2013 related to increasing performance Shredded Storage is very important when we are implementing content management solutions.

Shredded Storage requires both SharePoint and SQL Server to work together to provide this functionality. Shredded Storage is going to help us when we work with Binary Large Objects (BLOBs) – large Documents. This reduces the IO impact when saving multiple versions of a large documents by only sending delta (changes) by shredding the document into smaller pieces. It get reassembled again in to a single piece when someone wants to access it.

Is it really a new feature? Then what about the new protocols set introduced in SharePoint 2010 which send only the delta from the client to server? Good question. In SharePoint 2010, though SharePoint supported tracking and sending only the delta (changes) from Client to Server (WFE) with the new protocols introduces, from WFE to SQL Server it had to be a single BLOB since SQL Server didn’t support accepting the BLOB in pieces. In SharePoint 2010, though the communication between Client and WFE was improved, the communication between the WFE and the SQL Server was not improved.

In SharePoint 2013, the communication between WFE and the backend SQL Server database also improved to work with multiple pieces of BLOB rather than a single BLOB.

Shredded Storage:

  • Reduces the amount of data saved in the SQL Server content database
  • Decreases the amount of network traffic between the SharePoint WFE servers and the SQL servers
  • Allows for faster back up of of the large content databases

Following visualization will make it easy to understand how Shredded Storage works:

Prior to SharePoint 2010:

image

  1. Client request for a 10MB file from SharePoint
  2. 10MB file retrieved from the Database and sent to WFE
  3. 10MB file sent from WFE to Client
  4. Client makes 1MB change and file becomes 11MB
  5. Client sends 11MB file to the WFE
  6. 11MB file get transferred to Database
  7. 21MB of content get stored into the content database – original 10MB file and the new 11MB file
In SharePoint 2010:

image

  1. Client request for a 10MB file from SharePoint
  2. 10MB file retrieved from the Database and sent to WFE
  3. 10MB file sent from WFE to Client
  4. Client makes 1MB change
  5. Client sends 1MB of change (only the delta) to the WFE
  6. WFE merges the 1MB of change to original 10MB file
  7. 11MB file get transferred to Database
  8. 11MB of content get stored into the content database – original 10MB file and the new 1MB change
In SharePoint 2013 with Shredded Storage:

image

  1. Client request for a 10MB file from SharePoint
  2. 10MB file retrieved from the Database and sent to WFE
  3. 10MB file sent from WFE to Client
  4. Client makes 1MB change
  5. Client sends 1MB of content (only the delta) to the WFE
  6. WFE sends 1MB of content (only the delta) to the Database server
  7. 11MB of content get stored into the content database – original 10MB file and the new 1MB change

Other benefits of Shredded Storage:

  • User can open a previously cached document
  • Users can start working with the document before it completely downloaded
  • Documents are uploaded to the server in the background without blocking user interface

Shredded Storage is enabled by default. If you wish you can disable it or re-enable at the Web Application level.

Shredded Storage makes working with documents much faster and less overhead.

Posted by Joy